Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Pre-school Storytime: Soup's On

 
Preschool Storytime: “Soup’s On” 
Age 3-6, also done as outreach for "GrandFriends"  – Kindergartners and Seniors combined storytime.
 
Featuring soup stories and songs,
incorporating fiction and non-fiction,  concepts of alphabet, emotions, and months of the year
and participatory storytelling of a classic folk tale.
 
 

Entrance Song: “Animal Crackers in my Soup” – from John Lithgow’s Farkle & Friends J730 LITH
 
Book: Growing Vegetable Soup – Lois Ehlert (vocabulary, non-fiction concepts of gardening & food prep)
“Piggy Back” Song/Action: This is the Way we… make the Soup (lyrics for this and all other songs below) (reinforces sequencing)
 
Book: Soup Day – Melissa Iwai
 
Interactive story with props (pot, puppets, & veggies): Stone Soup  (Participatory storytelling, mentioned old story many variants – I use the Ann McGovern version with old lady and young man - script below)
 
Song/Action: “Doing the Chocolate Shake” (chocolate soup) – used when needed to get out the wiggles
 
Song/Flannel:  "Alphabet Soup" by Tom Chapin (reinforces alphabet) 
 
Book: Mean Soup – Betsy Everitt or That is NOT a Good Idea -- Mo Willems
 
Song:  "If you are happy and you know it…" .. sad, angry, loving
 
Book/Cards/Song: Chicken Soup with Rice – Maurice Sendak, tune by Carole King from “Really Rosie” (concept: the names of the months)
 
Book (outreach only): Monkey Soup – Louis Sachar (child makes her father a special kind of soup to help get him well – silly!)   (used this book in Kachoos&BooBoos storytime in-house)
 
DVD (in house only): Armadilly Chili (Nutmeg Media, PPR)
 
Hand Stamping Song: Stone Soup (Song on Linda Arnold’s album "Make Believe”)
 
Another possibility: Last Stop on Market Street – Matt de la Pena -- grandmother & child travel on a bus to serve at a soup kitchen
LYRICS:
 
This is the way we…make the soup
(lyrics by Carol Levin, tune: “Mulberry Bush”   Action song following Growing Vegetable Soup by Lois Ehlert)
 
This is the way we plant the seeds(3x)…to make our vegetable soup. (plant)
This is the way we water and weed… (kneel)
This is the way the sun will shine… (arms)
This is the way the plants will grow… (rise)
This is the way we pick and dig…
This is the way we wash and scrub…
This is the way we slice and dice…
This is the way we put them into the pot…
This is the way we stir and sniff…
This is the way we eat the soup… (blow and eat)

Alphabet Soup --  Song on Tom Chapin's album "Moonboat" (alphabet, food)  flannel patterns available
Now gather 'round children, it's time for a treat.
Dinnertime's comin', who wants to eat?
I do.  I do.  I do, too!
Then I'll make Alphabet Soup with you.
              
Chorus:
Grab yourself a letter, throw it in a pot.
Stir it up, stew it up, serve it real hot.
Read it while you eat it.  Feed the whole troop.
Can't get enough of that Alphabet Soup. 
(clap, clap) Can't get enough of that Alphabet Soup.
 
A is for Apple, B for beans,
Corn, Dill, Eggs, French Fries, Greens.
What d'ya got so far?  Look and see.
A B C D E F G, what?  A B C D E F G!
chorus
 
Ham Bone, Ice Cream, Jelly, Ketchup, Lamb,
Meat, Noodles, Onions, Peas please, Ma'am.
What d'ya got so far?  Look and see.
H I J K L M N O P, what?  H I J K L M N O P!
chorus
 
Quince, Radish, Salt, Turnips, Unicorn Horn,
Veal Chop, Watermelon…Unicorn Horn?
Play my Xylophone while it's stewin'.
Let's put Yams in.  Let's put You in!
A big Zucchini when no one's looking.
Now we've got the whole alphabet cooking.
Alphabet Soup couldn't be better.
Let's say the whole thing letter by letter:
 
A B C D E F G
H I J K L M N O P
Q R S T U V
W X Y and Z.
 
Let's go 'round and sing it again.
Then pass me a S-P-O-O-N.
 
If You're Happy and You Know It Clap Your Hands – Traditional  (action, body parts, emotions)
 
If you're happy and you know it clap your hands (clap, clap)
If you're happy and you know your hands (clap, clap)
If you're happy and you know it, then your face will surely show it,
If you're happy and you know it, clap your hands (clap, clap)
2. Stomp your feet  3. Shout "Hurrah!"   4. Do all three.
Variation:
If you’re angry and you know it, stomp your feet (stomp, stomp)…
If you’re sad and you know it, shed a tear (sob, sob)…
If you’re loving and you know it, give a hug…etc.
 
Chicken Soup With Rice – book by Maurice Sendak, song on Carole King’s "Really Rosie" 
(food, seasons -- months)  (enlarge Sendak’s pictures from the small book and mount on cards)
 

In January, it’s so nice,
while slipping on the sliding ice.
To sip hot chicken soup with rice.
Sipping once, sipping twice,
sipping chicken soup with rice.
 
In February, it will be
my Snowman's anniversary
with cake for him and soup for me.
Happy once….
 
In March the wind blows down the door
and spills my soup upon the floor.
It laps it up and roars for more.
Blowing once….
 
In April I will go away
to far off Spain or old Bombay,
and dream about hot soup all day.
Oh my, once….
 
In May I truly think it best
to be a robin lightly dressed.
Concocting soup inside my nest.
Mix it once….
 
In June I saw a charming group
of roses all begin to droop.
I pepped them up with chicken soup!
Sprinkle once….
 
In July I'll take a peep
Into the cool and fishy deep
Where chicken soup is selling cheap!
Selling once….
 
In August it will be so hot
I will become a cooking pot
Cooking soup of course.  Why not?
Cooking once….
 
In September for a while
I will ride a crocodile
Down the Chicken soupy Nile.
Paddle once….
 
In October I'll be host
To witches, goblins, and a ghost.
I'll serve them chicken soup on toast.
Whoopy once….
 
In November's gusty gale
I will flop my flippy tail
And spout hot soup.  I'll be a whale!
Spouting once….
 
In December I will be
A baubled bangled Chistmas tree
With Soup bowls draped all over me.
Merry once….
 
I told you once
I told you twice
All seasons of the year are nice
For eating chicken soup with rice!
 

STONE SOUP - Ann McGovern

 
 
Act out the story of Stone Soup using either real or pretend food props, puppet people, or children taking parts. Parts and props are highlighted.  If you have many children who want to participate, the part of the man can be a whole family, and the part of the woman can be many villagers.
          
A young Man was walking.  He walked and he walked.  He walked all night.  And he walked all day.  He was tired.  And he was hungry.     At last he come to a big house.
 
"What a fine house," said the young man.  "There will be plenty of food for me here."  He knocked on the door.
 
A little old Lady opened it.
 
"Good lady," said the young man,  " I am very hungry.  Can you give me something to eat?"
 
"I have nothing to give you," said the little old lady.  "I have nothing in the house.  I have nothing in the garden".  And she began to close the door.
 
"Stop!" said the young man.  "If you will not give me something to eat, will you give me a stone?"
 
"A stone?" said the little old lady.  "What will you do with a stone?  You cannot eat a stone!"
 
"Ah," said the young man.  "I can make soup from a stone."
 
Now, the little old lady had never heard of that.  "Make soup from a stone?  Fancy that."
 
"There are stones in the road," said the little old lady.
 
The young man picked up a round gray Stone.  "This stone will make wonderful soup," he said.  "Now get me a pot."
 
The little old lady got a pot.               
 
"Fill the pot with water and put it on the fire," the young man said.
 
The little old lady did as she was told.  And soon the water was bubbling in the pot.
 
The young man put the round gray stone into the pot.  "Now we will wait for the stone to cook into soup," he said.                                                              
 
The pot bubbled and bubbled.
 
After a while, the little old lady said,  "This soup is cooking fast".
 
"It is cooking fast now," said the hungry young man.  "But it would cook faster with some onions."
          
So the little old lady went to the garden to get some yellow onions.  Into the pot went the yellow onions, with the round gray stone.
 
"Soup from a stone," said the little old lady.  "Fancy that."                The pot bubbled and bubbled.
 
After a while, the little old lady said,  "This soup smells good."
"It smells good now," said the hungry young man.  "But it would smell better with some carrots."
 
So the little old lady went to the garden and pulled up all the carrots she could carry.
 
            Into the pot went the long thin carrots,
                                    with the yellow onions,
                                    and the round gray stone.
            "Soup from a stone," said the little old lady.  "Fancy that."           The pot bubbled and bubbled.
 
After a while, the little old lady said,  "This soup tastes good."
 
"It tastes good now, " said the hungry young man.  "But it would taste better with beef bones."
 
So the little old lady went to get some juicy beef bones.
            Into the pot went the juicy beef bones,
                                    and the long thin carrots,
                                    and the yellow onions,
                                    and the round gray stone.
            "Soup from a stone," said the little old lady.  "Fancy that."            The pot bubbled and bubbled.
 
After a while, the little old lady said,  "This soup is fit for a prince."
 
"It is fit for a prince now," said the hungry young man.  "But it would be fit for a king with a bit of pepper and an handful of salt."
 
So the little old lady got the pepper and the salt.
            Into the pot went the pepper and the handful of salt,
                                    with the juicy beef bones,
                                    and the long thin carrots,
                                    and the yellow onions,
                                    and the round, gray stone.
 
            "Soup from a stone," said the little old lady.  "Fancy that."            The pot bubbled and bubbled.
 
After a while the little old lady said,  "This soup is too thin."
 
"It is too thin now," said the hungry young man.  "But it would be nice and thick with some butter and barley."                    Into the pot went the butter and barley,
                                    With the bit of pepper and the handful of salt,
                                    with the juicy beef bones,
                                    and the long thin carrots,
                                    and the yellow onions,
                                    and the round, gray stone.
 
            "Soup from a stone," said the little old lady.  "Fancy that."             The pot bubbled and bubbled.
 
After a while the little old lady tasted the soup again.  "That is good soup," she said.
 
"Yes," said the hungry young man.  This soup is fit for a king.           Now we will eat it."
 
"Stop!" said the little old lady.  "This soup is indeed fit for a king.  Now I will set a table fit for a king."  So she took out her best tablecloth and her best dishes.
 
Then the little old lady and the hungry young man ate all the soup--
                                    the soup made with the butter and barley,
                                    and the bit of pepper
                                    and the handful of salt
                                    with the juicy beef bones,
                                    and the long thin carrots,
                                    and the yellow onions,
                                    and the round, gray stone.
 
"Soup from a stone," said the little old lady.  "Fancy that."
 
"Now I must be on my way," said the young man.  He took the stone out of the pot, and put it into his pocket.
 
"Why are you taking the stone?" said the little old lady.
 
"Well," said the young man.  "The stone is not cooked enough.  I will have to cook it some more tomorrow."
 
And the young man said good-bye.
 
He walked on down the road.  He walked and he walked.  "What a fine supper I will have tomorrow,"  he said to himself.
 
"Soup from a stone.  Fancy that!"
 
 

Stone Soup Recipe 

(Make stone soup in the classroom.)
 
                        1 clean stone (optional)
                        1 lb. canned tomatoes
                        1/4 c. chopped parsley                                                              
                        1/4 c. chopped celery leaves
                        1/2 tsp. salt
                        1/4 tsp. pepper
                        1/2 tsp. each marjoram, thyme, savory or any one of these
                        1 garlic clove, crushed or 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
                        3 to 6 cups chopped uncooked vegetables
                        (such as potatoes, carrots, green peppers,
                        onion, celery, beans, etc.)
 
·         Put stone and tomatoes into a pot containing 2 qts. of water
·         Add parsley, celery leaves, salt, pepper, herbs and garlic
·         Bring to a boil, then turn down heat and simmer
·         Add “hard” vegetables (e.g. onions, potatoes, carrots), boil 20 minutes or so, then add peppers, mushrooms and other soft veggies, boil until tender.
·         Taste, and add more salt and pepper if needed
·         Remove stone and serve!

 

2/16 BWL & Preschool Place

 

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