Thursday, December 19, 2013

Pre-School Storytime: What’s In the Oven?

 

Includes the retelling of two traditional folktales and a variant,
the ECRR concepts of narrative skill/retelling and singing,
non-fiction elements of farming and bread-baking,
plus a dash of mathematics and multiculturalism!
(This is a long program – pick and choose depending on ages in group.)

Book (folktale): The Little Red Hen -- Byron Barton(Alt. version: Paul Galdone)

Song: “Mulberry Bush” variant : This is the way we plant the seeds... Cut the stalks… Thresh the wheat.. Grind the wheat… Mix the batter…Knead the bread… Bake the bread… Eat our toast (Every Child Ready to Read skill (ECRR1)- narrative -- remembering sequence in book, vocabulary “thresh” “knead”; ECRR2 “singing”)

Book: Bread, Bread, Bread – Ann Morris (a multicultural look at breads around the world)

Book/Action Song: Peanut Butter and Jelly – Nadine Bernard Westcott Silly action song depicting the sequence of sandwich making (with elephants!)

Book: Bunny Cakes – Rosemary Wells Funny story and great example of ECCR2 skill “writing”)
Max is a great lead in to…

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Song/Flannel: Helping  by Shel Silverstein from Free to Be, You and Me. Lyrics & tune: http://singbookswithemily.wordpress.com/2013/08/08/helping-an-illustrated-song-by-shel-silverstein/

Storytelling with Flannelboard/Masks/Puppets (depending on size of group): The Gingerbread Man –Karen Chace has quite a few suggestions on her blog, including a link to Jan Brett’s beautiful printable masks:http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2012/11/the-gingerbread-man-stories-songs-and.html

Book & Flannel or Props: The Doorbell Rang – Pat Hutchins (K-1st): Used12 flannel (or real) children and 12 flanne/prop cookies to demonstrate the cookie “division” as I read this story – great numeracy exercise.

Action Song: Great Big Cookie (To the Tune of Linda Arnold’s “I am a Pizza”— these lyrics by Carol Simon Levin)
I am a cookie (circle hands over head)
Chocolately and round (extend hands out to sides)
Filled with lots of chocolate chips (point to chips)
The best that can be found (rub tummy)
I am a cookie (circle hands over head)
Take a bite of me (make chewing motions)
Tasty, sweet, delicious (extend hands out to sides)
I’m oh-so-yummy!  (rub tummy)
(gobble gobble gobble!)
(sing slowly, sadly)
I WAS a great big cookie (circle hands over head)
The very best around  (extend hands out to sides)
Now there’s nothing left of me (shake head)
Just crumbs upon the ground!  (sit down)

Optional Books (if time and if comfortable): In the Night Kitchen – Maurice Sendak or Little Mouse and the Big Cupcake – Thomas Taylor (cute book about sharing) Who Took the Cookies from the Cookie Jar? – Bonnie Lass & Philemon Sturges The Cookie Fiasco (Elephant & PIggie Like Reading Series) Dan Santat

Mother Goose Action Rhyme: Pat-a-cake, Pat-a-cake Baker’s Man
Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake Baker’s Man
Bake me a cake As fast as you can.
Roll it and pat it (Roll and clap hands)
And mark it with a B (Trace B on palm)
And put it in the oven (extend both hands)
For baby and me (point to Baby and Self)

or  Action: Make a Cake (source unknown)
Mix the batter, stir the batter (make a stirring motion with one arm/hand)
Shake some flour in (make a shaking motion with one arm/hand)
Mix the batter, stir the batter (make a stirring motion with one arm/hand)
Place it in a tin (pretend to pour)
Sprinkle in some raisins (pretend to sprinkle)
Pop it in to bake (open both hands, palms up, and slide them forward)
Open wide the oven door (pretend to open door)
And out comes the cake! (open both hands, palms up, and slide them forward)

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Optional Book or Flannel (if time): The Cake that Mack Ate – from the book by Rose Robart – the cumulative tale of what happened to the cake baked by the farmer’s wife – with a surprise ending, this silly folktale variation is a version of The House that Jack Built.

The Cake That Mack Ate (suggested flannel pieces above -- egg is missing from scan)

  • This is the CAKE that Mack Ate.
  • This is the EGG that went into the CAKE that Mack Ate.
  • This is the HEN that laid the EGG, that went into the CAKE that Mack Ate.
  • This is the CORN that fed the HEN that laid the EGG, that went into the CAKE that Mack Ate.
  • This is the SEED that grew into CORN, that fed the HEN that laid the EGG, that went into the CAKE that Mack Ate.
  • This is the FARMER who planted the SEED that grew into CORN, that fed the HEN that laid the EGG, that went into the CAKE that Mack Ate.
  • This the WOMAN who married the FARMER who planted the SEED that grew into CORN, that fed the HEN that laid the EGG, that went into the CAKE that Mack Ate.
  • These are the CANDLES that lit up the CAKE, that was made by the WOMAN who married the FARMER who planted the SEED that grew into CORN, that fed the HEN that laid the EGG, that went into the CAKE that Mack Ate.
  • This is MACK...
  • He ate the CAKE!



DVD/Video: Reading Rainbow: Florence & Eric Take the Cake—Jocelyn Wild  (the book is narrated by Julia Child but a little long, sometimes I just show the amazing cake decorating segment (also available on Youtube) -- the kids adore guessing what the cake will be!) or Reading Rainbow: How to Bake an Apple Pie and See the World – Marjorie Priceman. 
 
Encourage bread baking at home with this handout : http://www.breadworld.com/fesp_archive/ChildrenGetStirringWhenBakingBread.pdf

11.12, 3.14, 12.14

12.15: Bread

The Little Red Hen - Barton
This is the Way...
Bread, Bread, Bread – Morris
Peanut Butter & Jelly – Westcott
?
 

12.15: Cookies & Cupcakes

The Doorbell Rang - Hutchins (w flannel)
song: Great Big Cookie -- I am a cookie...crumbs upon the ground
natural lead in to:
Gingerbread Man - storytelling with puppets
Bunny Cakes - Wells
Song/Flannel: Helping
In the Night Kitchen -- Sendak
Action song -- pair up: Paddy Cake
Flannel: The Cake the Mack Ate -
RR: Florence & Eric thru end of bakery segment
 

12.16 BWL: Holiday Baking – Cookie Fun

 

The Doorbell Rang - Hutchins (w flannel)
mention “natural divison” (Bedtimemath.com)

Action Song: Great Big Cookie (kids echo each line)
(To the Tune of
Linda Arnold’s “I am a Pizza”— these lyrics by Carol Simon Levin)

I am a cookie (circle hands over head)

Chocolately and round (extend hands out to sides)

Filled with lots of chocolate chips (point to chips)

The best that can be found (rub tummy)

I am a cookie (circle hands over head)

Take a bite of me (make chewing motions)

Tasty, sweet, delicious (extend hands out to sides)

I’m oh-so-yummy!  (rub tummy)

(gobble gobble gobble!)

(sing slowly, sadly)

I WAS a great big cookie (circle hands over head)

The very best around  (extend hands out to sides)

Now there’s nothing left of me (shake head)

Just crumbs upon the ground!  (sit down)

Cookie Count by Robert Sabuda (wkrm) Great pop-up.

The Cow Loves Cookies by Karma Wilson and/or The Duckling Gets a Cookie by Mo Willems

Action Rhyme: “Who Stole the Cookies?”
Who stole the cookies from the cookie jar?
Kitty stole the cookies from the cookie jar.
Who me? Yes, you!
Couldn’t be? Then who?

Participatory storytelling with puppets: Gingerbread Man

DVD: If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff (RR DVD- WGL)

 

Baking https://storytimekatie.com/2012/11/26/cookies/

Craft: Make Gingerbread Man story puppets: http://resources.mysparklebox.co.uk/6000-7000/sb6672.pdf (or Ellison die cuts -- we didn’t have fox die), stiff B&T cardboard to mount, gluesticks, markers, popsicle sticks & tape, also had hole punch and ribbon for those who wanted to hang their puppets (or nametag) as a tree ornament.

 

Branchburg: 4/17 – young crowd, focused on cookies.

 

Brief story handout for Gingerbread Man:

 

The Gingerbread Man (Puppets or Flannel)

Once upon a time, there was a little old woman and a little old man who lived in a small house in the country.

Every year,  the little old woman baked a Gingerbread Man to share with the little old man. She turned on the oven and got out a very big bowl. She measured and mixed in some sugar and some flour and some molasses.

Then she cut out the Gingerbread Man shape. She added some raisins for eyes and red hot candies for buttons.

Then into the hot oven went the Gingerbread Man!

After a while, the little old woman opened the oven door and peeked in to see if the Gingerbread Man was finished baking. But as she opened the door of the oven, the Gingerbread Man hopped off of the baking sheet and onto her shoulder and onto the counter and onto the floor – and ran right out the door.

Stop! Yelled the old woman. But the Gingerbread Man called back, “Run Run Run as fast as you can -- you can’t catch me I’m the Gingerbread Man!” And off he ran.

The old man saw the Gingerbread Man and ran to catch him. But the Gingerbread Man called back, “I’ve run away from the old woman, and I can run away from you I can I can. Run Run Run as fast as you can -- you can’t catch me I’m the Gingerbread Man!” And off he ran.

Around the corner, the Gingerbread Man met a pig who said to him, “Wait Mr. Gingerbread Man, you look so good, I’d like to eat you!” But the Gingerbread Man just ran faster as he said, “I’ve run away from the old woman and the old man and I can run away from you I can I can. Run, run, run as fast as you can. You can’t catch me, I’m the Gingerbread Man!”

Next the Gingerbread Man met a horse who also said, “Wait Mr. Gingerbread Man, you look so good, I’d like to eat you!” But the Gingerbread Man just ran faster as he said, “I’ve run away from the old woman and the old man and the pig and I can run away from you I can I can. Run, run, run as fast as you can. You can’t catch me, I’m the Gingerbread Man!”

Soon the Gingerbread Man met a cow who said, “Wait Mr. Gingerbread Man, you look so good, I’d like to eat you!” The Gingerbread Man was getting tired, but he could still outrun a cow, so once again he said, “I’ve run away from the old woman and the old man and the pig and I can run away from you I can I can. Run, run, run as fast as you can. You can’t catch me, I’m the Gingerbread Man!”

Then the Gingerbread Man saw a river just ahead. Behind him were  the cow and the horse and the pig and the little old man and the little old woman still running after him! Just then a fox came out and said, “Hello Mr. Gingerbread Man, you look tired. Lucky for you that I don’t like gingerbread!”

The Gingerbread Man replied, “Yes, I’m running away from a cow and a dog and a horse and a pig and a little old man and a little old woman – because they all want to eat me! And I can’t cross this river because I will get wet!”

The fox said, “I’m a good swimmer, climb on my back and I will swim across the river and you won’t get wet.” “Thank you Mr. Fox,” said the Gingerbread Man. And he climbed on the back of the fox who slid into the cold water.

As they reached the very middle of the river, where the water is deepest, the fox said, “The water is getting deep, perhaps you had better climb onto my head so that you don’t get wet!” The Gingerbread Man was afraid to get so close to those big fox teeth, but he had no choice. So he hopped up onto the fox’s head.

Then the fox said, “You will be even safer from getting your feet wet if you sit on my nose.” The Gingerbread Man was really scared, but he believed what the fox said – especially since the fox didn’t like to eat gingerbread. So, he slowly climbed onto the fox’s nose.

And – just when he got settled there, the fox flipped his nose up which tossed the Gingerbread Man up in the air. And the fox caught him in his wide open mouth. “Yum!” said the fox. “That was worth a cold swim in the river!”

Adapted by Carol Simon Levin from:www.statelibraryofiowa.org/ld/t-z/youthservices/early-child-lit/ecl-docs/gingerbread-script

Optional (not used) The Gingerbread Man – Eric Kimmel, Live Oak Video (VHS)

https://storytimekatie.com/2012/11/26/cookies/

https://madelynslibraryprogramming.wordpress.com/2016/10/05/toddler-storytime-desserts/

https://librarianleah.wordpress.com/2015/11/18/cookies/

https://sunflowerstorytime.com/2014/09/12/milk-cookies/


School Age Storytime: Baking Up a Storm!


Book: Thunder Cake – Patricia Polacco – Based on a true story from the author’s childhood (we discussed autobiography & personal narratives) in which the author’s grandma (Babushka) helped her overcome her fear of thunderstorms by having her gather the ingredients for a “thunder cake.”

Action: Make a Rainstorm – directions here: http://carolsimonlevin.blogspot.com/2013/12/pre-school-storytime-its-raining-its.html

Special inclusion today because of Nelson Mandela: “Sometimes it isn’t only nature that can make a thunderstorm of change, sometimes people do it too..” Book: Nelson Mandela Kadir Nelson)—omitted some of the other titles below to make time for this.

Book: Bunny Cakes – Rosemary Wells (K-1st): Funny story and great example of Every Child Ready to Read skill “writing”) or Cook-a-Doodle-Doo! – (1st-4th) Amusing variant of The Little Red Hen --  when Rooster sets out to cook strawberry shortcake, his friends are eager to help but they fill the kitchen with cooking confusion. A great introduction to cooking terminology and measurement with non-fiction notes on the side. (If children aren’t already familiar with the folktale upon which this story is based, Jerry Pinckney, Byron Barton and Paul Galdone all offer nice versions.)

(K-1st) If adding folktale  The Little Red Hen (any traditional version) could add “Mulberry Bush” variant song: This is the way we plant the seeds... Cut the stalks… Thresh the wheat.. Grind the wheat… Mix the batter…Knead the bread… Bake the bread… Eat our toast (ECRR1- narrative -- remembering sequence in book, vocabulary “thresh” “knead”; ECRR2 “singing”)

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Song/Flannel: Helping (K-1) by Shel Silverstein from Free to Be, You and Me. Lyrics & tune: http://singbookswithemily.wordpress.com/2013/08/08/helping-an-illustrated-song-by-shel-silverstein/

Storytelling with Flannelboard/Masks/Puppets (depending on size of group): The Gingerbread Man –Karen Chace has quite a few suggestions on her blog, including a link to Jan Brett’s beautiful printable masks:http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2012/11/the-gingerbread-man-stories-songs-and.html or The Cazuela that the Farm Maiden Stirred Samantha Vamos (Spanish/English cooperation story –fun to act out with masks or puppets.)

Book & Flannel or Props: The Doorbell Rang – Pat Hutchins (K-1st): Used12 flannel (or real) children and 12 flanne/prop cookies to demonstrate the cookie “division” as I read this story – great numeracy exercise.

image_thumb3
Optional Book or Flannel (if time): The Cake that Mack Ate – from the book by Rose Robart – the cumulative tale of what happened to the cake baked by the farmer’s wife – with a surprise ending, this silly folktale variation is a version of The House that Jack Built.

The Cake That Mack Ate (suggested flannel pieces above -- egg is missing from scan)




  • This is the CAKE that Mack Ate.
  • This is the EGG that went into the CAKE that Mack Ate.
  • This is the HEN that laid the EGG, that went into the CAKE that Mack Ate.
  • This is the CORN that fed the HEN that laid the EGG, that went into the CAKE that Mack Ate.
  • This is the SEED that grew into CORN, that fed the HEN that laid the EGG, that went into the CAKE that Mack Ate.
  • This is the FARMER who planted the SEED that grew into CORN, that fed the HEN that laid the EGG, that went into the CAKE that Mack Ate.
  • This the WOMAN who married the FARMER who planted the SEED that grew into CORN, that fed the HEN that laid the EGG, that went into the CAKE that Mack Ate.
  • These are the CANDLES that lit up the CAKE, that was made by the WOMAN who married the FARMER who planted the SEED that grew into CORN, that fed the HEN that laid the EGG, that went into the CAKE that Mack Ate.
  • This is MACK...
  • He ate the CAKE!


Book (seasonal selection): December – Eve Bunting -- A mother and son living in a cardboard box share what they have with an old woman one Christmas Eve and find that their luck changes afterward or anytime title Wild Boars Cook – Meg Rosoff  Bossy, selfish, stinky, and hungry boars whip up a messy massive pudding in this hilarious book.

Additional possibilities:  Bread, Bread, Bread – Ann Morris or Everybody Bakes Bread – Norah Dooley (both provide a multicultural look at breads around the world), How to Bake an Apple Pie and See the World – Marjorie Priceman (also available as a DVD), Clever Jack Takes the Cake-- Candice Fleming, Don’t Forget – Patricia Lakin (4th grade up )while buying ingredients for her mother’s birthday cake, Sarah learns the meaning of the blue numbers tattooed on the shopkeeper’s arm.

Encourage bread baking at home with this handout :
http://www.breadworld.com/fesp_archive/ChildrenGetStirringWhenBakingBread.pdf


12.13

 

Other possibilities:
Peanut Butter & Cupcake by Terry Border
Lady Pancake & SIr French Toast by Josh Fink
Tough Cookie by David Wisniewski

Saturday, December 7, 2013

School Age Storytime: Gifts and Giving

 
Storytimes emphasizing the non-material aspects of giving and receiving.
Great lead-ins for holiday coat & food drives.
Also includes a true story about how a town fought hate.

Looking for additional special holiday titles?  Check out this bibliography: http://www.somerset.lib.nj.us/kids/PDFs/holidays2011.pdf
 
Extraordinary Gifts 12.16 BWL
(done in addition to a “very special trees” & “holiday lights” programs earlier in the month) K&1st + Ms. Valentine’s 2nd
 
Image result
 
Giving by Shirley Hughes (explores the different kinds of giving & sharing)

The Teddy Bear by David McPhail (A young boy’s lost teddy bear becomes a comfort to a homeless man)
 
Action Song: “Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear, Turn Around”
Silver Packages: An Appalachian Christmas Story by Cynthia Rylant (Loosely-based on a true story. A rich man rides a train through Appalachia every year at Christmas tossing gifts to the poor children who are waiting in order to repay a debt he owes the people who live there  the young boy waiting for gifts each year who grows up and also gives back to the community.)

The Marvelous Toy by Tom Paxton (sung) (Several book versions available. hand-me-down toy has special meaning; performed here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCjslf_a11c)
 
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Oskar and the Eight Blessings by Richard and Tanya Simon (a young German Jewish refugee in 1938 traversing 100 blocks of Manhattan to meet his aunt rejoices in the kindnesses he encounters from people along the way)

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What a Wonderful World based on the song by Bob Thiele & George David Weiss, illustrated by Tim Hopgood (Louis Armstrong version performed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21LGv8Cf0us)

Encouraged kids to look for ways they could contribute to less fortunate – coat, food, toy drives…



"Gifts of Kindness"  12.12


Boxes for Katje – Candace Fleming  (Based on a true story -- boxes from children in America helped townspeople in Holland after WW2) (Also available as a DVD from Spoken Arts)

Sing: The Marvelous Toy – Tom Paxton  (Several book versions available. hand-me-down toy has special meaning; performed here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCjslf_a11c)

The Christmas Menorahs: How a Town Fought Hate -- Janice Cohen (True story of how the town of Billings Montana stood up to hate speech and hateful actions -- the text is rather long for a read-aloud, so I have abridged it -- my adaption is below.) or Each Kindness – Jacqueline Woodson/Lewis (a new girl at school is rejected by other students -- kind & unkind acts cause ripples that sometimes cannot be undone)

The Extraordinary Gift – Florence Langlois (Imaginative fold out book which says that the best gift is a book!)

If time, can add some of the materials from the programs below.





Gifts & Giving 12.11


The Carpenter's Gift: A Christmas Tale About the Rockefeller Center Tree – David Rubel. (Wonderful story loosely based on the actual history of the Rockefeller Center Tree in the Depression. The tree's wood is now used for Habitat for Humanity Houses.   Here's a link:
http://earth911.com/news/2011/11/30/what-happens-to-the-rockefeller-tree-after-christmas-2/
http://www.habitat.org/newsroom/2010archive/12_23_2010_rockefeller_christmas_tree.aspx)


New Old Shoes – Charlotte Blessing (One child's outgrown shoes go on to other children -- told from the point of view of the shoes!) Here's the link for http://www.soles4souls.org/ 

Immi's Gift – Karin Littlewood (Modern magical fable, somewhat reminiscent of David Wiesner’s Flotsam -- an Inuit girl finds colorful objects in her fishing hole, later the bear she drops is found by a boy in the tropics who had dropped those objects in the water!)  Interesting quote from the author: “I had written her story and drawn her again and again, but this little girl I knew so well did not have a name. Then I came across the Inuit name Immi and knew it was right for her. It was only much later that I found out Immi is short for Immiayuk, meaning echo, a word that seems very fitting for this story." - Karin Littlewood, author and illustrator of Immi's Gift  and/or Rabbit's Gift: A Fable from China – Shannon (Each animal decides to give the turnip found on their doorsteps to another.)

Book/Song:  The Marvelous Toy – Tom Paxton (Father gives son the same marvelous toy he received from his dad years before.)

The Gift of Nothing – Patrick McDonnell (Clever fable of the importance of friendship in this materialistic world!) and/or The Gift – Gabriella Keselman (Extremely funny book in which parents are desperately trying to  figure out what their child wants as a present -- until they realize it is a hug.)

The Extraordinary Gift – Florence Langlois (Imaginative fold out book which says that the best gift is a book!)

If you are interested in helping your kids and families explore the value of "nothing" (or experiences rather than stuff), you might want to add this link to your parent pages: Reclaiming the Holidays (from PBS.Parents)  http://www.pbs.org/parents/experts/archive/2011/11/reclaiming-the-holidays.html







Gifts & Giving 12.10

Silver Packages -- Cynthia Rylant (Loosely-based on a true story. A rich man rides a train through Appalachia every year at Christmas tossing gifts to the poor children who are waiting in order to repay a debt he owes the people who live there  the young boy waiting for gifts each year who grows up and also gives back to the community.)

The Marvelous Toy - Tom Paxton (sung)

The Trees of the Dancing Goats -- Patricia Polacco (also based on a true story from the author's childhood about how her family helped neighbors in need.)

Glove with 10 international children: Uno, Dos, Tres amigos... (here:
http://carolsimonlevin.blogspot.com/search?q=amigos)

Storytelling with props: The Surprise – George Shannon (Need 5 boxes that nest inside each other, 2 small squirrels stuffed animals (one for the beginning of the skit and one that sits inside the smallest box) and  optionally, a big squirrel Folkmanis puppet.)
The Surprise by George Shannon

Squirrel was worried.
His mother’s birthday was one day away and he still hadn’t found her a present.
She had perfume & books & the most beautiful garden.
He’d already given her drawings, and songs that he’d made up.
And every time he made a cake,
he burned it.
He sighed and said “I’ll just have to send her a plain old birthday card,” but as he was putting the stamp on, he had an idea.
He called his mother on the telephone and said, “I’m sending you a package with a surprise inside. Be sure to open it right away!”
The next day when the package arrived, his mother took off the ribbons and opened the box.
But there was another box inside.
So she opened that box – and found another box!
And opened that box – and found another box!
And opened that box – and found another box!
And when she opened that box…
Squirrel jumped out and gave her a big kiss!

Night Tree - Eve Bunting (family decorates a tree in the forest with food for the animals)  or  December – Eve Bunting (a mother and son living in a cardboard box share what they have with an old woman one Christmas Eve and find that their luck changes afterward.) or The Teddy Bear – David McPhail (A boy who loses his teddy decides that the homeless man who has found it needs it more)

Additional books to consider: Giving – Shirley Hughes, Elizabeti's Doll – Stephanie Stuve-Bodeen, Gifts – Jo Ellen Bogart,Merry Christmas Big Hungry Bear – Audrey Wood, The Gift – Gabriela Keselman,  Knuffle Bunny 2 – Mo Willems, That Rabbit Belongs to Emily Brown – Cowell, Paper Cranes – Rosemary Wells, Extra Yarn – Mac Barnett, Shall I Knit You a Hat? – Kate Klise, Morris’ Disappearing Bag – Rosemary Wells, A Hat for Mrs. Goldman by Michele Edwards

Additional Song/Flannel: “Helping” from the book: Free to Be You and Me by Marlo Thomas & Friends.
 


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The Christmas Menorahs: How a Town Fought Hate 
Adaption/abridgement by Carol Simon Levin from the book by Janice Cohn.
I show the pictures from the book while telling the story something like this:
 
Not too many years ago, a boy named Isaac Schnitzer lived with his mother and father in the town of Billings Montana (might show location on a map so kids understand this is in the USA).
 
On the third night of Chanukah -- just as they did on every night of Chanukah --Isaac's family lit their menorahs and placed them in the windows of their house.    A little while later, Isaac heard a crash.  Heading upstairs toward the sound, he discovered that the window to his bedroom was shattered and a rock lay on the floor.
 
His parents rushed upstairs -- then called the police.
 
When Chief Inman arrived, he suggested that it might be safer if they took down their menorahs.
 
But Isaac's mom replied, “We’re not taking down the Chanukah decorations.  Being Jewish is who we are—we are not going to hide it.”
 
“You shouldn’t have to,” responded the chief, “but there is a small group of people in Billings who have been causing a lot of trouble.   They’ve  sent out leaflets saying hateful things about Jews.  They’ve spray-painted threats and insults on a Native American home and tried to frighten African-Americans in their church.  Just last week they damaged a synagogue – now they are throwing rocks at menorahs.”
 
“Let’s put our menorahs away,” said Isaac.  “Then maybe they won’t bother us again.”
 
His dad put his arm around him. “I know how you feel.  It’s frightening.  But celebrating Chanukah is part of being Jewish.  It is what we believe in.  We’re not about to let some bullies keep us from celebrating our holiday.”
 
“But what can we do?” asked Isaac.
 
“Isaac,” said his mom, “A lot of people in this town—all kinds of people—are really angry at what these haters have been doing.  I’m going to be interviewed on TV and tell  everyone in Billings what happened to us and ask people to help.”
 
“Yes,” agreed the Chief, “If the whole town takes a stand, we can stand up to these bullies.”
 
Many people in Billings saw Mrs. Schnitzer on TV.  Afterwards, a special meeting was called by Chief Inman and a friend of their family named Ms. McDonald.
 
“The police are doing everything they can to catch these people,” Chief Inman told the crowd.  “But it’s important to show that an act of hate against even one person in Billings is an act against all of us.”
 
“I have an idea,” said Ms. McDonald.  “I remember a story my parents told me. When the Nazis invaded Denmark during World War 2, they ordered all Jews to wear a yellow star on their clothes so that they could be easily identified.  The courageous King of Denmark believed that the lives of all the Danish people were precious.  According to legend, King Christian said that if the Jews had to wear stars, then he would too. The next morning, riding his horse out of the palace, he did.   Soon many other Danes also wore stars -- even though the enemy threatened to punish them.  Because of their courage, the lives of many Jews were saved.”
 
“The Schnitzers have been told it would be safer for them to take down their menorahs,” she continued, “but that is not the answer.  What if the rest of us were told to take down our Christmas trees and lights because people might throw rocks at us for being Christians?  I say, let’s take a stand like the Danish people – let’s all put up menorahs!”
 
And that is just what happened.   Some citizens in Billings cut menorahs out of construction paper and taped them to their windows.   Then the newspaper published a picture of a menorah and even more people taped them to their windows.  Soon menorahs appeared in houses on almost every street in the town.
 
Isaac’s friend Teresa Hanley had never seen a menorah -- so Isaac explained about the Maccabees and the miracle of the oil.  His teacher pointed out that Chanukah celebrates the fight for religious freedom.
 
A few days later, Isaac was driving in the car with  his mom.  “Mom, remember last year when I told you I wanted to bring some of my Chanukah presents to school to show the other guys?”
 
“Uh-huh,” his mom answered.
 
“Well…now don’t be mad…but I didn’t tell them they were Chanukah presents.  I felt funny.  Nobody else gets Chanukah presents.  And I didn’t want to be different.  I just wanted to be like the rest of the class so I told them they were Christmas presents.  But this year I’m going to say I got them for Chanukah.”
 
“I’m glad, Isaac,” his mom answered.
 
“Mom, stop!”
 
“What is it?”
 
“Look!”
 
Ahead was a house with a big picture window. Taped to the window was a large picture of a beautiful menorah drawn with many brightly colored crayons.  Over the menorah was the message.  “For our friend Isaac – with love from Teresa and the rest of the Hanley family.”  Underneath was a picture of a Jewish star and a Christian cross.
 
“She never told me she was doing this…” Isaac said.
 
“You know, honey,” his mom replied.  “Hate can make a lot of noise.  Love and courage are usually quieter.  But in the end, they’re the strongest.”
 
As Chanukah passed and Christmas grew nearer, more and more menorahs could be seen throughout Billings.  The town continued to fight against the acts of hatred, and slowly but surely those acts began to stop.  The townspeople told each other this was a gift they had given to themselves.  And that it was their best holiday gift, ever.
 

Pre-School Storytime: Gifts and Giving

 

“All Presents Accounted For”

A storytime emphasizing non-tangible gift-giving, with songs, storytelling, and lots of surprises!  I use for Winter Holidays but could easily be adapted for birthdays.

Entrance music: Bob McGrath Christmas Sing Along #8 (Twelve Days of Xmas), # 9 (Winter Wonderland) (J850 MCGR) or Beethoven’s Wig 3 (734 BEET)

Hello Everybody – welcome song for names on the board

Book: Giving – Shirley Hughes (some kinds of giving are helpful, others not so much.) “good kinds of gifts/bad kinds of gifts reminds me of a song about helping”

Flannel: “Helping” from Free to Be, You and Me – Marlo Thomas and friends (some kinds of helping is helpful, others not so much.)

Book: Rabbit’s Gift – George Shannon (Chinese folktale in which each animal tries to share the turnip left at his doorstep.)

Storytelling with props/flannel: The Great Big Enormous Turnip based on the book by Alexsey Nikolayevich Tolstoy and/or flannel: Ask Mr. Bear based on the book by Marjorie Flack

and/or The Surprise – George Shannon (Need 5 boxes that nest inside each other, 2 small squirrels stuffed animals (one for the beginning of the skit and one that sits inside the smallest box) and optionally, a big squirrel Folkmanis puppet.)

The Surprise by George Shannon
Squirrel was worried.
His mother’s birthday was one day away and he still hadn’t found her a present.
She had perfume & books & the most beautiful garden.
He’d already given her drawings, and songs that he’d made up.
And every time he made a cake,
he burned it.
He sighed and said “I’ll just have to send her a plain old birthday card,” but as he was putting the stamp on, he had an idea.
He called his mother on the telephone and said, “I’m sending you a package with a surprise inside. Be sure to open it right away!”
The next day when the package arrived, his mother took off the ribbons and opened the box.
But there was another box inside.
So she opened that box – and found another box!
And opened that box – and found another box!
And opened that box – and found another box!
And when she opened that box…
Squirrel jumped out and gave her a big kiss!

Song: If you’re happy & you know it, sad, angry etc.

The Gift – Gabriela Keselman (Mickey's birthday is coming and his parents cannot figure out what to do when he tells them that he wants something big, strong, smooth, sweet, warm, funny, and long-lasting – kids can read the letters of the words.) or The Gift of Nothing – Patrick McDonnell or Immi’s Gift – Karin Littlewood or The Extraordinary Gift – Florence Langlois

Book/Song: The Marvelous Toy – Tom Paxton (kids act out all the motions in the choruses with me)

Prop: Oh What is in that Little Box (3 mice) From: What I Like: Poems for the Very Young by Gervase Phinn (modified)
Oh, what is in that little box,
Whatever can it be?
Could it be a spider
Or a buzzing bumble bee,
A slimy snail or a slippery slug,
Or a tiny jumping flea?
Oh, what is in that little box,
Whatever can it be?

  Oh, what is in that little box,
Whatever can it be?
Could it be a wiggly worm,
Wriggling to be free,
A beetle or a spotted bug,
Or a tiny chimpanzee?
Oh, what is in that little box,
Whatever can it be?
Oh, what is in that little box,
Whatever can it be?
I wish that I could open it,
    But I haven't got the key.
    But wait a minute, the lid is loose,
    I'll open it and see.
Oh, look what is in the little box:
Three white mice!   One, two, three!
For the first two verses, the lid is on, but I'm making it move a bit by moving my fingers. The third verse, you open the lid and show the mice.

DVD: Morris’s Disappearing Bag – Wells (on The Rosemary Wells DVD library)

Song: We Wish You a Happy Chanukah, Merry Christmas, Happy Kwanzaa, Happy New Year…
(lyrics to this and many other holiday songs here: http://carolsimonlevin.blogspot.com/2013/12/singalong-keep-spiritwinter-holiday.html)

Hand-stamping to “Marvelous Toy” on Tom Paxton’s album “Goin’ to the Zoo” 730 PAXT

12.12
Additional books to consider: Night Tree – Eve Bunting – too long to read to most preschool groups, but “tells” well, Merry Christmas Big Hungry Bear – Audrey Wood. Gifts – Jo EllenBogart,   Birthday Box – Leslie Patricelli (act this out), The Birthday Moon – Lois Duncan
Additional Songs: (earth ball pass-around): We’ve Got the Whole World in Our Hands  (...Mommies & Daddies; Sisters & Brothers; Grandmas and Grandpas; Itty Bitty Baby; You & Me; Hugs & Kisses; Whole World), All I Really Need (Raffi), This Little Light of Mine.
Looking for additional special holiday titles?  Check out this bibliography: http://www.somerset.lib.nj.us/kids/PDFs/holidays2011.pdf

Did this during Chanukah and in addition to a story/craft program http://carolsimonlevin.blogspot.com/2014/12/its-wrap-storycraft-program-ages-3-10.html, 

so made some changes:

Rabbit’s Gift – George Shannon (2015)
Prop/Story  - The Surprise (details above) -- consider acting out The Great Big Enormous Turnip next year.
Book: Immi's Gift -- Karin Littlewood (2014)
unexpected gift brightened child's day - tonight lighting a light:
Song/glove puppets: Chanukah Candles
"One little, two little, three little candles; Four little, five little, six little candles; Seven little, Eight little Chanukah candles; The shamas lights them all."
Book: Giving -- Shirley Hughes (2014)
The Gift – Gabriela Kesselman (2015)
Book/Song: The Marvelous Toy -- Tom Paxton (acted out the chorus)
Prop/Rhyme: Oh What is in that Little Box (details above)
Flannel: I had a Little Dreidel (used additional verses from: http://carolsimonlevin.blogspot.com/2013/12/singalong-keep-spiritwinter-holiday.html)
this present a surprise too:
Song: He'll Be Riding on the North Wind lyrics: http://carolsimonlevin.blogspot.com/2013/12/singalong-keep-spiritwinter-holiday.html
DVD: Morris' Disappearing Bag
Book: The Extraordinary Gift -- Florence Langlois (fold-out pages reveal amazing gifts – but best of all is a book!)
12.14 & 12.15

 

Singalong: Keep the Spirit–Winter Holiday Songs



Winter Holiday Singalong Plans: (All Ages)
Open with “The More We Get Together” – solicit children’s suggestions for other activities.

Sing Hanukkah songs with flannels (suggest that kids might make their own verses for the dreidel song) – end section with action “Spin Little Dreidel.”)

Sing “Flying on the Northwind” and “Rudolph,”  then sing “Frosty the Snowman” either with book or flannel.

Pass out musical rhythm band instruments for “cacophony chorus” – sing and/or play from CDs: “Jingle Bells,” "Feliz Navidad," “Little Drummer Boy,” “Deck the Halls” – collect instruments.  Season’s Greetings from Twentieth Century Masters, 2001 or Christmas Now has nice versions.

Sing (with or without the books): “The Marvelous Toy” by Tom Paxton (both the version illustrated by Elizabeth Sayles and the one illustrated by Steve Cox are nice) and/or a version of “The Twelve Days of Christmas.”

Sing: “This Little Light of Mine” and “We Wish You a Merry…”

Finish by singing Joe Raposo’s song “Sing” (on many Sesame Street albums.) At the end of my singalongs, everyone (kids and adults!) forms a large circle and sing “Sing” twice through.

(Sing the first time through very quietly:)Sing, sing a song.
Sing out loud  -- sing out strong.
Sing of good things -- not bad
Sing of happy -- not sad.
Sing, sing a song.
Make it simple to last your whole life long.
Don't worry that it's not good enough
For anyone else to hear --
Just sing, sing a song.

La, la, la, la, la --  La, la, la, la, la (everyone holds hands and strides into the center of the circle)La, la, la, la, la, la, la (everyone backs out of the circle)Again, La, la….

(Then repeat the verses again but at full voice with emphasis…)Sing, sing a song.
Sing out loud  -- sing out strong!
Sing of good things -- not bad.
Sing of happy -- not sad.
Sing, sing a song.
Make it simple to last your whole life long.
Don't worry that it's not good enough
For anyone else to hear --
Just sing, sing a song!
Just sing, sing a song!
(At the end of the song, we all sink to our knees, and I say any closing words e.g. “I hope you have a happy and healthy holiday season” before hand-stamping the children.)
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12.12, 12.14

Picture This – “Art Takes Flight with Ashley Bryan”



Discover the exuberant artwork of Ashley Bryan, award-winning illustrator of songs and folk tales, then create your own collage illustrations in his signature style!


· Read selections from Ashley Bryan: Words to My Life’s Song JB BRYAN, Beautiful Blackbird J398.20968 BRYA. Explained project and played Louis Armstrong music while I showed illustrations from What a Wonderful World Oversize Weiss

· Play music from The Wonderful World of Louis Armstrong ACD 625 ARM and Jazz for Kids J730 JAZZ

· Create Collages -- Materials, white tagboard, colored construction paper scraps & whole, scissors, pencils, gluesticks

ALA Conference 2009: Ashley Bryan Steals the Show.  Read the full article at:
http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/article/CA6670590.html&

Picture This – Art Exploration for Kids “Quilting Our Way to Freedom: How Quilts Helped Slaves Find their Way North”

“Come hear some fascinating stories about how quilts helped guide slaves to freedom along the Underground Railroad, then create your own story-quilt.” Kindergarten through 5th grade.

· Have kids browse through Black History Month titles, and quilting books as they enter

· Discuss Underground Railroad (not a real railroad), Harriet Tubman, slavery & escape

· Read Under the Quilt of Night (PicBk Hopkinson)

· Show Show Way (Reading Rainbow DVD through end of book segment)

· Talk about creating our own “Show Way” – quilt of something important in our lives or family history

· Create “quilts” -- (Supplies: 11x17 tagboard, wallpaper squares, scrap fabric & felt, tacky glue) markers, crayons, magazine squares, glue)

· Showed the rest of Show Way while kids worked, continued with The Patchwork Quilt (also Reading Rainbow) (both Reading Rainbow episodes discuss family history, Show Way has a sensitive treatment of a grandmother who is a Holocaust survivor (her story of hiding has echoes of the Underground Railroad.)

· Additional possibilities: The Patchwork Patch (PicBk Stroud), Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt (PicBk Hopkinson) The Secret to Freedom (PicBk Vaughan), Most Loved in All the World (Pic Bk Hegamin ) or read another quilt-based underground railroad book.


Reading Rainbow: The Patchwork Quilt.

Picture This – Art Exploration for Kids: “Celebrate Black History Month with award-winning illustrator Bryan Collier”


“Come listen to “Rosa” an incredible book celebrating Rosa Parks’ courage in the face of discrimination, then view a video interview with Bryan Collier and create pictures in his signature style, a vibrant mix of watercolor and collage.”

PreSchool Storytime: Flutterby Butterfly!


 A look at the life cycle of the butterfly, celebrating individual differences, nature and change, with music, movement and a dash of sign language!

Opening music: Morning Magic -730 Bartels track #4 onward or "Butterfly" -- track #9 on Bari Koral Family Rock Band's Anna and the Cupcakes


Pop-up version : Very Hungry Caterpillar – Eric Carle (can also use regular version or do this as a flannelboard using the Folkmanis caterpillar/butterfly puppet.  I made a flannel “chrysalis pouch” and tucked the caterpillar inside and turned it inside-out for a magic transformation!) – also used counting cards and had kids anticipate the days of the week.

Action Song: Roly Poly Caterpillar (lyrics to all songs & flannelboards follow)

Bob and Otto – Robert & Nick Bruel  (Otto the worm is saddened when his friend Bob the caterpillar becomes a butterfly until Bob reassures him that his role in digging through the earth is critical in this story which beautifully combines earth science and the power of friendship.)  Can booktalk Bubba and Trixie -- Lisa Campbell Ernst (beautiful story -- a ladybug with a crumbled wing who cannot fly helps a caterpillar overcome his  reluctance to experience change) 

Sign Language Song: "Look up Look Down" (alt: "Let's Take a Little Walk") -from Pick Me Up: Fun Songs for Learning Signs – Robert Berg, et. all 419 PIC



Briefly showed pages in A Butterfly is Patient – Dianna Hutts Aston (595.789 AST) (Beautiful illustrations and two-level text. For pre-school groups, I read the large text and explain the meaning but don’t read the text boxes out loud.  Great info (difference between cocoon & chrysalis, butterflies smell with antenae, taste with their feet!) and vocab  (“proboscis” “camouflage”) to share.)  Booktalked new title on monarch butterfly migration: Traveling Butterflies by Susumu Shingu.

Flannel: Color Butterflies (optional: using counting cards)

Song: Life of a Butterfly (use chrysalis & caterpillar puppet if didn’t use for Very Hungry Caterpillar)

Briefly showed cool different-sized pages from Waiting for Wings by Lois Ehlert

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DVD: Waiting for Wings (on Weston Woods PPR DVD "Spring Science” -- a beautiful musical version of Lois Ehlert’s story -- I pass out scarves when the butterflies hatch on video. We dance with scarves then usually run the video a 2nd time and we act out the life cycle with the scarves) Preschools w/o DVD player, dance to track #1 of George Winston’s album Summer or "Butterfly" -- track #9 on Bari Koral Family Rock Band's Anna and the Cupcakes .


Optional (for older groups if time—art inspiration): Questions, Questions – Marcus Pfister

Hand stamping (or within program):

"Butterfly" -- track #8 on Hap Palmer's Animal Antics

More great ideas: http://storytimewithmisstara.blogspot.com/2013/05/pre-k-caterpillars-butterflies-and-moths.html, http://storytimewithmisstara.blogspot.com/2013/07/pre-k-worms.html
Additional possibilities:
A Caterpillar’s Wish – Mary Murphy  (younger groups)
The Crunching Munching Caterpillar – Sheridan Cain (also a pop-up)
The Secret Life of the Woolly Bear Caterpillar – Lawrence Pringle
If At First You Do Not See -- Ruth Brown (age 5+ groups) – great turn-around book



LYRICS:

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ROLY POLY CATERPILLAR Tune: “Eensy Weensy Spider”
The Roly-poly caterpillar (Creep arm like a caterpillar.)
Into a corner crept.
Spun around himself a blanket (Spin around.)
Then for a long time slept. (Rest head on hands, eyes closed.)
The Roly-poly caterpillar
Wakening by and by (Open eyes and stretch.)
Found himself with beautiful wings
Changed to a butterfly. (Flutter arms like wings)


THE LIFE OF A BUTTERFLY Tune: “Skip to My Lou”
I'm a caterpillar, wiggle with me,
I'm a caterpillar, wiggle with me,
I'm a caterpillar, wiggle with me,
What'll I be, my darlin'?
A chrysalis, now sleep like me.....
What'll I be, my darlin'?
A butterfly, come fly with me...
Come fly with me my darlin'.
Now all together, lets do all three.
A caterpillar, a chrysalis, a butterfly -- three.
Move your body like this with me.
The life of a butterfly, darlin'.

FLANNEL: COLOR BUTTERFLIES
The first to come to the garden bed
Is a lovely butterfly of brilliant red.
Then in comes another and that makes two,
Fly right in, my friend of blue.
"The garden is fine, the best I've seen,"
Says the butterfly of springtime green.
Our garden needs a sunshiny fellow,
Fly in, butterfly with wings of yellow.
Little friend of purple, fly in too,
This garden is waiting for a color like you.
Orange, orange, you've waited so long,
Fly right in where you belong.
Butterflies, butterflies, you're such a sight,
Flying together-a springtime delight!


BWL 5.14, 5.16, BGL 5.17

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Sharing the Pop-Up Very Hungry Caterpillar & acting out the life cycle of a butterfly with the DVD musical version of Lois Ehlert’s “Waiting for Wings”

BWL 5.17 – added butterfly flier craft – used pipe cleaners for antennae,  used butterfly masks for the butterfly, markers, dot paints, and google eyes to decorate.  Found easiest to staple butterfly and pipe cleaner to tp roll.  Also had life cycle drawings available to color.

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St. Bernards 5.17
Pop Up Very Hungry Caterpillar with flannel chrysallis/puppet “reveal”
Song: “The Life of a Butterfly”
Bob & Otto
Song: “Make New Friends, but Keep the Old”
A Butterfly is Patient (read some pages, told others depending on age of kids)
Sign-Language Song: “Look Up, Look Down” (#10 from Pick Me Up)
Kindergarten only: If At First You Do Not See by Ruth Brown
Beautiful Hands by Kathryn Otoshi
Singable Book: What a Wonderful World, illustrated by Ashley Bryan
Danced with scarves to Louis Armstrong version (track #1 on The Best of Louis Armstrong)

Other possible rhymes & fingerplays:

A CATERPILLAR CRAWLED
A caterpillar crawled to the top of a tree.
[Extend left arm and crawl right index finger up it like a caterpillar.]
"I think I'll take a nap," said he.
[Wiggle right index finger.]
So under the leaf he began to creep.
[Move under left hand.]
He spun a cocoon and he fell asleep.
[Make fist around index finger.]
For two long weeks he slept in that cocoon bed,
Till spring came along and said,
"Wake up! Wake up! You sleepy head."
[Shake arms.]
Out of the leaf he did cry.
[Hook thumbs and spread fingers to make a butterfly.]
"Look, I am a butterfly."

LITTLE CATERPILLAR
There was a little caterpillar crawling all about
He worked and he worked without a doubt.
[Wiggle one finger.]
Wrapping himself in a snug cocoon.
Waiting and waiting, will it be soon?
[Place finger in palm of other hand, wrap fingers around.]
Look, he’s coming out, my oh my!
For now he’s become a beautiful butterfly.
[Cross thumbs and let fingers be flapping butterfly wings.]

MY FRIENDLY CATERPILLAR
My friendly Caterpillar [Fingers crawl up arm.]
Made its cocoon one day. [Close hands together.]
It turned into a butterfly [Open hands with thumbs hooked together.]
And quickly flew away. [Flap hands.]

clip_image004BUTTERFLY
Tune: “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star”
Flutter, flutter butterfly
Floating in the springtime sky
Floating by for all to see
Floating by so merrily
Flutter, flutter, butterfly
Floating in the springtime sky!
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