Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Pre-School Storytime: Valentine’s Day & Celebrating Friendship

Ages 3-6: Stories and songs celebrating friendship.  Includes a non-fiction book showing how animals greet each other, concepts of shape and direction, numeracy and rhyme. 
Optional additions address loss and bullying prevention.


Music playing when enter: More Tickles and Tunes (Track #5 Razzama Tazzama)

Book: My Friend Rabbit – Eric Rohmann (Caldecott Winner, sometimes friends drive us crazy!)

Flannel: Snowman’s Valentine  (source unknown)
Fay made a snowman, fat and fine
And oh how his button eyes did shine
When little Fay
Gave him today
A big red heart for a valentine

follow with:
Flannel & Rabbit Puppet: A Chubby Little Snowman (source unknown)
A chubby little snowman had a carrot nose
Along came a bunny, what do you suppose?
That hungry little bunny, looking for his lunch
Ate the snowman’s carrot nose
Nibble, Nibble, Crunch!



Book: Mouse’s First Valentine
– Lauren Thompson (guessing game – children figure out what is being used to make the valentine) – not that interesting, didn’t hold their interest 2017

Flannel: This Valentine is shaped like… (shapes, rhymes = phonemic awareness)
This valentine is shaped like a square
This valentine is shaped like a bear
This valentine is shaped like a circle
This valentine colored purple
This valentine is shaped like a rectangle
This valentine is shaped like a triangle
This valentine is shaped like a dove
This valentine is shaped with love!

Stretch: Head Shoulders Knees & Toes


“Animals use different body parts to say hello”

Hello, Hello! – Miriam Schlein (narrative non-fiction: ID animals, animal behavior)

Song: If You’re Happy & You Know It
 


“Some friends might not be human”

Book: Boy + Bot – Ame Dyckman  or  Clara and Asha -- Eric Rohmann (try Strictly No Elephants – Lisa Mantchev in 2017)

Flannel: May I Bring a Friend? based on the book by Beatrice Schenk de Regniers (1964 Caldecott Winner)

Song: Skinnamarink from Sharon, Lois, and Bram’s  One elephant, deux éléphants (also on other albums)

Skidamarink a dink a dink, Skidamarink a doo, I love you. (2x)
I love you in the morning, And in the afternoon, I love you in the evening
And underneath the moon;
Oh, Skidamarink a dink a dink, Skidamarink a doo,I love you!



Book
(some groups): City Dog, Country Frog – Mo Willems (beautiful story of friendship, loss, and renewal)  and/or One --  Kathryn Otoshi – (anti-bullying parable where the number one stands up for the color blue against the red bully and all the colors discover that everyone counts.)

Flannel: Hi Harry (source unknown) – No one has time to play with Harry Tortoise until Sam Snail shows up…


Song: Make New Friends but Keep the Old
(traditional)
Make new friends but keep the old,one is silver and the other gold
A circle’s round, it has no end – that’s how long I want to be your friend!
 



Optional: Book: If You’ll Be My Valentine – Cynthia Rylant (rhymes articulate the different valentines a boy makes for family members and pets)

Glove or Flannel: Five Little Valentines (source unknown, can use numeral cards to reinforce subtraction numeracy)
Five little valentines from the grocery store - I sent one to mother, now there are four
Four little valentines pretty ones to see - I gave one to my brother now there are three
Three little valentines, what´ll I do? - I gave one to my sister now there are two
Two little valentines , it´s so much fun - I gave one to Daddy, now there is one
One little valentine, I´m almost through
Who should I give it to?  I gave it to YOU!

Optional VHS: One Zillion Valentines (Weston Woods) Reading Rainbow: Best Friends

Other possible titles:

Ribbit! by Rodrigo Folgueira
Flora & the Flamingo by Milly Idle
Unicorn Thinks He's Pretty Great by Bob Shea
The Lamb-a-Roo by Diana Kimpton and The Day it Rained Hearts by Felicia Bond – Fran favorites

2.14

2.17: Emphasis on friendship and sticking up for each other in a difficult time.

Music playing as kids enter & during craft – Happy Feet album by Fred Penner
Book: Friendshape by Amy Krouse Rosethal
Flannel: This Valentine (shapes)


Book: One Good Deed by Terri Fields (Nice, a bit long, had to abridge for afternoon group)
Flannel: Snowman’s Valentine 
Action song: Happy Feet #8 from Fred Penner’s album
One by Kathryn Otoshi
Glove or Flannel: Five Little Valentines
Flannel: May I Bring a Friend? based on the book by Beatrice Schenk de Regniers (1964 Caldecott Winner) – skipped p.m.
Song: If You’re Happy & You Know It
If time: Book: Strictly No Elephants by Lisa Mantchev and/or Because of You by B.G. Hennessey or Whoever You Are by Mem Fox – no time for any, use next time?
Book: My Heart is Like a Zoo by Michael Hall  --> Valentine crafts (supplies: die cut hearts, foam hearts & letters, googly eyes, stickers, scrap paper, scissors, glue sticks, pipe cleaners, tape, 12x18 boards, white, pink, and red construction paper for cards, scrap construction paper.)

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School Age Storytime: Valentine’s Day and Friendship


In-school storytime for Kindergarten through 3rd graders.  Incorporates kindness, anti-bullying, Black History Month, monsters, humor, and a bit of wacky math! (40 min. long )




Somebody Loves You Mr. Hatch
by Eileen Spinelli (how thinking someone cared for him helped Mr. Hatch come out of his shyness and friend and be befriended by his neighbors -- aside for brief discussion of stranger safety.)

One by Kathryn Otoshi (anti-bullying parable where the number one stands up for the color blue against the red bully and all the colors discover that everyone counts.)

The Other Side by Jacqueline Woodson, Sister Anne's Hands by MaryBeth Lorbiecki or Freedom Summer by Deborah Wiles (mentioned that when I was their age, there were places in our country where black children and white children couldn't go to the same schools, playgrounds, libraries etc.  Vocabulary: "segregation" = separation.)

Leonardo the Terrible Monster  by Mo Willems (queried kids if they could name his other works: Pigeon, Knufflebunny, and Elephant & Piggie books)  Leonardo decides to give up being a terrible monster and be a wonderful friend instead.

Love Letters by Arnold Adoff (811.54) (amusing Valentine poems)
This Plus That, Life's Little Equations by Amy Rosenthal (clever look at how big and small moments add up in life.) or Chopsticks by Amy Rosenthal (after a pair of chopsticks get separated, each friends eventually learns to stand on its own.)



Additional Book Possibilities:
Bink & Gollie – Kate DeCamillo
Babuska Baba Yaga – Patricia Polacco
Alex & Lulu: Two of a Kind – Lorena Simonovich
One of Each –  Mary Ann Hoberman
Unicorn Thinks He's Pretty Great -- Bob Shea
2.12



Pre-School Storytime: Mousing Around!

A cozy interactive storytime for a cold day!
Ages 3-6: This story and song program explores colors, shapes, numbers,
the days of the week, poetry, and even a bit of sign language.
Note: This is a long program, may choose to omit one or more segments.



Music as children enter: Selection of mouse songs -- options include: Alex Mitnick’s Animals We Dream (track #6), Steve Pullar’s ZooBoogie! (#4), More Songs from Bear in the Big Blue House (#18), Laurie Berkner’s Rocketship Run (#3), Blue Dog Record’s It’s A Small World (#6), Phil Rosenthal’s Animal Songs (#7)

Opening poem with puppet: “Oh, What Is in that Little Box?” (Adapted from: What I Like: Poems for the Very Young by Gervase Phin) (Prop: Present box with 3 mice inside puppet from Folkmanis)

Oh, what is in that little box, Whatever can it be?

Could it be a spider or a buzzing bumble bee,
A slimy snail or a slippery slug, or a tiny jumping flea?

Oh, what is in that little box, Whatever can it be?   
Oh, what is in that little box, Whatever can it be?

Could it be a wiggly worm, wriggling to be free,
A beetle or a spotted bug, or a tiny chimpanzee?

Oh, what is in that little box, Whatever can it be?     
Oh, what is in that little box, Whatever can it be?

I wish that I could open it,
    But I haven't got the key.
    But wait a minute, the lid is loose,
    I'll open it and see.

Oh, look what is in the little box:
Three white mice!   One, two, three!
For the first two verses, the lid is on, but I'm making it move a bit by moving my fingers. The third verse, you open the lid and show the mice.

Book: Mouse Mess – Linnea Riley (alternatives: What’s for Lunch? – John Schindel or Mice  -- Rose Fyleman/Lois Ehlert)

Song: Hickory Dickory Dock (props: grandfather clock with movable hands, finger puppet mouse) -- This is an awareness introduction to analog clocks -- I don’t actually talk about the minute hand but I put up numeral cards on the flannel board to emphasize numbers and clap out the time (“struck 2” clap twice, etc.)
Hickory-Dickory dock
The Mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck one
And down he runs
Hickory-Dickory dock (2- “the mouse said ‘boo’”, 3- “the mouse went ‘whee’”, 4- “no more” or “wants some more” if you want to continue with additional hours 5 - “took a dive” 6 - “he’s in a fix” etc.)

Flannel: Mouse House (Great for introducing/reviewing/practicing colors & shapes -- I pause as I take out each flannel piece (in bold below) to ask the kids to identify its color and shape)
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MOUSE HOUSE (source unknown)
Mollie Mouse lived in the big house of the Swathmore family. But she wanted her own cozy little house. She looked around the playroom of the Swathmore children for a cozy little house.
First she tried the toybox, but it was way too big.
Next she tried the jack-in-the-box, but it was much too crowded.

Then she tried the music box, but it was too loud.
Finally Mollie Mouse said, "I'll have to build a cozy little house all by myself.
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So she went to the toy box and found a red square block.
(Place red square on flannel board)
"Perfect," she said, "but it still doesn't feel like home."
So she went back to the toy box and found a...
Blue rectangle block, (door)
Green half-circle block, (door mat)
Orange triangle block, (roof)
One yellow round cheese, (window)
Another yellow round cheese, (window)
And two pink balloons (chimneys).
"Perfect," she said, "now it finally feels like home. A cozy little mouse house."

Fingerplay: Quiet Mouse (optional prop: mouse finger puppet, encourage kids to use their finger - then repeat)

Once there lived a quiet mouse
(hold out fist with index finger extended)
In a quiet little house.
(insert index finger into other fist)
(whisper) When all was quiet as can be
Out Popped He!! (push finger out top of fist)



Book: Mouse Paint
- Ellen Stoll Walsh (explores primary & secondary colors, color mixing)


Flannel: Mouse Paint (tune: Three Blind Mice, lyrics Carol Simon Levin) - reinforces color mixing idea -- cut 3 Ellison die-cut flannel white mice, + 1 of blue, red, and yellow, 3 jars of paint, 3 puddles, and 3 mouse bottoms (green, purple, and orange) to place on the bottom half of each colored mouse to show what colors are mixed.)


Three white mice, three white mice.
Three jars of paint, three jars of paint.
One steps in the yellow, one steps in the red,
One steps in the blue, “Look!” they all said.
“Once we were white, Now we’re colored instead!”
No white mice. No white mice.

Three colored mice, three colored mice.
Three puddles of paint, three puddles of paint.
Red Mouse stirs the yellow, Blue Mouse stirs the red,
Yellow Mouse stirs the blue, She dances there too.
They dance and they mix -- What new colors are seen?
Orange, Purple, Green! Orange, Purple, Green!

Action: Little Mouse, Little Mouse Turn Around
Little Mouse, Little Mouse Turn Around
Little Mouse, Little Mouse Touch the Ground
Little Mouse, Little Mouse Wave Your Tail
Little Mouse, Little Mouse, Climb a Pail
Little Mouse, Little Mouse Eat Some Cheese
Little Mouse, Little Mouse Don’t forget to say “Please”
Little Mouse, Little Mouse Twitch your nose
Little Mouse, Little Mouse Touch your toes
Little Mouse, Little Mouse Scamper away
Little Mouse, Little Mouse The Cat is here to stay!



Book: Seven Blind Mice
– 398.2 Ed Young (traditional folktale, reinforces colors, days of the week, and is a guessing game)


Glove puppet: 5 Little Mice (tune: 5 Little Ducks, source unknown, can either use a cat puppet or teach kids the sign language sign: http://lifeprint.com/asl101/pages-signs/c/cat.htm) (Similar musical version on Liz Buchanan’s Once Upon a Tune (track #9), songs for learning signs on Music with Mar’s Singing and Signing Animals. I also use numeral cards and have kids hold up their fingers to emphasize numeracy.)

Five little mice came out to play
Gathering crumbs along the way
Out came the pussycat, big and fat
One little mouse goes scampering back.
Continue with Four, Three, Two, One... until there are no more mice. Optional codicil by Carol Simon Levin:
No more mice came out to play
Until that cat did go away
When that cat was truly gone
Five little mice came back along.



Book: The Little Mouse, Red Ripe Strawberry and the Big Hungry Bear
– Don and Audrey Wood (We always chant the “big hungry bear” together in our big bear voices, sometimes I also teach the signs for “bear” (http://lifeprint.com/asl101/pages-signs/b/bear.htm), “strawberry” (http://www.babysignlanguagedictionary-mysmarthands.com/strawberry_-_ASL_sign_for_strawberry.html) and “mouse” (http://lifeprint.com/asl101/pages-signs/m/mouse.htm)

Alternate Book: Who Sank the Boat? – Pamela Allen
Alternate Action Songs: The Farmer in the Dell (traditional: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Farmer_in_the_Dell) or The Mouse Ran Around the Room (Hi-Ho-the Derry Oh) cat, bear, kids – optional puppets)



DVD: Picnic
(Emily Arnold McCully, Weston Woods, Public Performance Rights – "I can’t give you all tickets to go to the Caribbean right now so great to fantasize about a summer’s day!" ) (Afterwards briefly talked about value of wordless narrative (ECRR2 “talking” -- kids articulating the story themselves, booktalked 2014 Caldecott Honors -- all wordless books.) Alternative: Reading Rainbow -- If you give a mouse a cookie.

Hand stamping music: Buckwheat Zydeco’s Bayou Boogie (track “The Mice ate my Rice”) -- kids got up and danced.

Display other books by Ellen Stoll Walsh and Emily Arnold McCully, folktale versions of “City Mouse, Country Mouse” plus additional “mice” titles.

2.14

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Pre-school Storytime: Soup's On

 
Preschool Storytime: “Soup’s On” 
Age 3-6, also done as outreach for "GrandFriends"  – Kindergartners and Seniors combined storytime.
 
Featuring soup stories and songs,
incorporating fiction and non-fiction,  concepts of alphabet, emotions, and months of the year
and participatory storytelling of a classic folk tale.
 
 

Entrance Song: “Animal Crackers in my Soup” – from John Lithgow’s Farkle & Friends J730 LITH
 
Book: Growing Vegetable Soup – Lois Ehlert (vocabulary, non-fiction concepts of gardening & food prep)
“Piggy Back” Song/Action: This is the Way we… make the Soup (lyrics for this and all other songs below) (reinforces sequencing)
 
Book: Soup Day – Melissa Iwai
 
Interactive story with props (pot, puppets, & veggies): Stone Soup  (Participatory storytelling, mentioned old story many variants – I use the Ann McGovern version with old lady and young man - script below)
 
Song/Action: “Doing the Chocolate Shake” (chocolate soup) – used when needed to get out the wiggles
 
Song/Flannel:  "Alphabet Soup" by Tom Chapin (reinforces alphabet) 
 
Book: Mean Soup – Betsy Everitt or That is NOT a Good Idea -- Mo Willems
 
Song:  "If you are happy and you know it…" .. sad, angry, loving
 
Book/Cards/Song: Chicken Soup with Rice – Maurice Sendak, tune by Carole King from “Really Rosie” (concept: the names of the months)
 
Book (outreach only): Monkey Soup – Louis Sachar (child makes her father a special kind of soup to help get him well – silly!)   (used this book in Kachoos&BooBoos storytime in-house)
 
DVD (in house only): Armadilly Chili (Nutmeg Media, PPR)
 
Hand Stamping Song: Stone Soup (Song on Linda Arnold’s album "Make Believe”)
 
Another possibility: Last Stop on Market Street – Matt de la Pena -- grandmother & child travel on a bus to serve at a soup kitchen
LYRICS:
 
This is the way we…make the soup
(lyrics by Carol Levin, tune: “Mulberry Bush”   Action song following Growing Vegetable Soup by Lois Ehlert)
 
This is the way we plant the seeds(3x)…to make our vegetable soup. (plant)
This is the way we water and weed… (kneel)
This is the way the sun will shine… (arms)
This is the way the plants will grow… (rise)
This is the way we pick and dig…
This is the way we wash and scrub…
This is the way we slice and dice…
This is the way we put them into the pot…
This is the way we stir and sniff…
This is the way we eat the soup… (blow and eat)

Alphabet Soup --  Song on Tom Chapin's album "Moonboat" (alphabet, food)  flannel patterns available
Now gather 'round children, it's time for a treat.
Dinnertime's comin', who wants to eat?
I do.  I do.  I do, too!
Then I'll make Alphabet Soup with you.
              
Chorus:
Grab yourself a letter, throw it in a pot.
Stir it up, stew it up, serve it real hot.
Read it while you eat it.  Feed the whole troop.
Can't get enough of that Alphabet Soup. 
(clap, clap) Can't get enough of that Alphabet Soup.
 
A is for Apple, B for beans,
Corn, Dill, Eggs, French Fries, Greens.
What d'ya got so far?  Look and see.
A B C D E F G, what?  A B C D E F G!
chorus
 
Ham Bone, Ice Cream, Jelly, Ketchup, Lamb,
Meat, Noodles, Onions, Peas please, Ma'am.
What d'ya got so far?  Look and see.
H I J K L M N O P, what?  H I J K L M N O P!
chorus
 
Quince, Radish, Salt, Turnips, Unicorn Horn,
Veal Chop, Watermelon…Unicorn Horn?
Play my Xylophone while it's stewin'.
Let's put Yams in.  Let's put You in!
A big Zucchini when no one's looking.
Now we've got the whole alphabet cooking.
Alphabet Soup couldn't be better.
Let's say the whole thing letter by letter:
 
A B C D E F G
H I J K L M N O P
Q R S T U V
W X Y and Z.
 
Let's go 'round and sing it again.
Then pass me a S-P-O-O-N.
 
If You're Happy and You Know It Clap Your Hands – Traditional  (action, body parts, emotions)
 
If you're happy and you know it clap your hands (clap, clap)
If you're happy and you know your hands (clap, clap)
If you're happy and you know it, then your face will surely show it,
If you're happy and you know it, clap your hands (clap, clap)
2. Stomp your feet  3. Shout "Hurrah!"   4. Do all three.
Variation:
If you’re angry and you know it, stomp your feet (stomp, stomp)…
If you’re sad and you know it, shed a tear (sob, sob)…
If you’re loving and you know it, give a hug…etc.
 
Chicken Soup With Rice – book by Maurice Sendak, song on Carole King’s "Really Rosie" 
(food, seasons -- months)  (enlarge Sendak’s pictures from the small book and mount on cards)
 

In January, it’s so nice,
while slipping on the sliding ice.
To sip hot chicken soup with rice.
Sipping once, sipping twice,
sipping chicken soup with rice.
 
In February, it will be
my Snowman's anniversary
with cake for him and soup for me.
Happy once….
 
In March the wind blows down the door
and spills my soup upon the floor.
It laps it up and roars for more.
Blowing once….
 
In April I will go away
to far off Spain or old Bombay,
and dream about hot soup all day.
Oh my, once….
 
In May I truly think it best
to be a robin lightly dressed.
Concocting soup inside my nest.
Mix it once….
 
In June I saw a charming group
of roses all begin to droop.
I pepped them up with chicken soup!
Sprinkle once….
 
In July I'll take a peep
Into the cool and fishy deep
Where chicken soup is selling cheap!
Selling once….
 
In August it will be so hot
I will become a cooking pot
Cooking soup of course.  Why not?
Cooking once….
 
In September for a while
I will ride a crocodile
Down the Chicken soupy Nile.
Paddle once….
 
In October I'll be host
To witches, goblins, and a ghost.
I'll serve them chicken soup on toast.
Whoopy once….
 
In November's gusty gale
I will flop my flippy tail
And spout hot soup.  I'll be a whale!
Spouting once….
 
In December I will be
A baubled bangled Chistmas tree
With Soup bowls draped all over me.
Merry once….
 
I told you once
I told you twice
All seasons of the year are nice
For eating chicken soup with rice!
 

STONE SOUP - Ann McGovern

 
 
Act out the story of Stone Soup using either real or pretend food props, puppet people, or children taking parts. Parts and props are highlighted.  If you have many children who want to participate, the part of the man can be a whole family, and the part of the woman can be many villagers.
          
A young Man was walking.  He walked and he walked.  He walked all night.  And he walked all day.  He was tired.  And he was hungry.     At last he come to a big house.
 
"What a fine house," said the young man.  "There will be plenty of food for me here."  He knocked on the door.
 
A little old Lady opened it.
 
"Good lady," said the young man,  " I am very hungry.  Can you give me something to eat?"
 
"I have nothing to give you," said the little old lady.  "I have nothing in the house.  I have nothing in the garden".  And she began to close the door.
 
"Stop!" said the young man.  "If you will not give me something to eat, will you give me a stone?"
 
"A stone?" said the little old lady.  "What will you do with a stone?  You cannot eat a stone!"
 
"Ah," said the young man.  "I can make soup from a stone."
 
Now, the little old lady had never heard of that.  "Make soup from a stone?  Fancy that."
 
"There are stones in the road," said the little old lady.
 
The young man picked up a round gray Stone.  "This stone will make wonderful soup," he said.  "Now get me a pot."
 
The little old lady got a pot.               
 
"Fill the pot with water and put it on the fire," the young man said.
 
The little old lady did as she was told.  And soon the water was bubbling in the pot.
 
The young man put the round gray stone into the pot.  "Now we will wait for the stone to cook into soup," he said.                                                              
 
The pot bubbled and bubbled.
 
After a while, the little old lady said,  "This soup is cooking fast".
 
"It is cooking fast now," said the hungry young man.  "But it would cook faster with some onions."
          
So the little old lady went to the garden to get some yellow onions.  Into the pot went the yellow onions, with the round gray stone.
 
"Soup from a stone," said the little old lady.  "Fancy that."                The pot bubbled and bubbled.
 
After a while, the little old lady said,  "This soup smells good."
"It smells good now," said the hungry young man.  "But it would smell better with some carrots."
 
So the little old lady went to the garden and pulled up all the carrots she could carry.
 
            Into the pot went the long thin carrots,
                                    with the yellow onions,
                                    and the round gray stone.
            "Soup from a stone," said the little old lady.  "Fancy that."           The pot bubbled and bubbled.
 
After a while, the little old lady said,  "This soup tastes good."
 
"It tastes good now, " said the hungry young man.  "But it would taste better with beef bones."
 
So the little old lady went to get some juicy beef bones.
            Into the pot went the juicy beef bones,
                                    and the long thin carrots,
                                    and the yellow onions,
                                    and the round gray stone.
            "Soup from a stone," said the little old lady.  "Fancy that."            The pot bubbled and bubbled.
 
After a while, the little old lady said,  "This soup is fit for a prince."
 
"It is fit for a prince now," said the hungry young man.  "But it would be fit for a king with a bit of pepper and an handful of salt."
 
So the little old lady got the pepper and the salt.
            Into the pot went the pepper and the handful of salt,
                                    with the juicy beef bones,
                                    and the long thin carrots,
                                    and the yellow onions,
                                    and the round, gray stone.
 
            "Soup from a stone," said the little old lady.  "Fancy that."            The pot bubbled and bubbled.
 
After a while the little old lady said,  "This soup is too thin."
 
"It is too thin now," said the hungry young man.  "But it would be nice and thick with some butter and barley."                    Into the pot went the butter and barley,
                                    With the bit of pepper and the handful of salt,
                                    with the juicy beef bones,
                                    and the long thin carrots,
                                    and the yellow onions,
                                    and the round, gray stone.
 
            "Soup from a stone," said the little old lady.  "Fancy that."             The pot bubbled and bubbled.
 
After a while the little old lady tasted the soup again.  "That is good soup," she said.
 
"Yes," said the hungry young man.  This soup is fit for a king.           Now we will eat it."
 
"Stop!" said the little old lady.  "This soup is indeed fit for a king.  Now I will set a table fit for a king."  So she took out her best tablecloth and her best dishes.
 
Then the little old lady and the hungry young man ate all the soup--
                                    the soup made with the butter and barley,
                                    and the bit of pepper
                                    and the handful of salt
                                    with the juicy beef bones,
                                    and the long thin carrots,
                                    and the yellow onions,
                                    and the round, gray stone.
 
"Soup from a stone," said the little old lady.  "Fancy that."
 
"Now I must be on my way," said the young man.  He took the stone out of the pot, and put it into his pocket.
 
"Why are you taking the stone?" said the little old lady.
 
"Well," said the young man.  "The stone is not cooked enough.  I will have to cook it some more tomorrow."
 
And the young man said good-bye.
 
He walked on down the road.  He walked and he walked.  "What a fine supper I will have tomorrow,"  he said to himself.
 
"Soup from a stone.  Fancy that!"
 
 

Stone Soup Recipe 

(Make stone soup in the classroom.)
 
                        1 clean stone (optional)
                        1 lb. canned tomatoes
                        1/4 c. chopped parsley                                                              
                        1/4 c. chopped celery leaves
                        1/2 tsp. salt
                        1/4 tsp. pepper
                        1/2 tsp. each marjoram, thyme, savory or any one of these
                        1 garlic clove, crushed or 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
                        3 to 6 cups chopped uncooked vegetables
                        (such as potatoes, carrots, green peppers,
                        onion, celery, beans, etc.)
 
·         Put stone and tomatoes into a pot containing 2 qts. of water
·         Add parsley, celery leaves, salt, pepper, herbs and garlic
·         Bring to a boil, then turn down heat and simmer
·         Add “hard” vegetables (e.g. onions, potatoes, carrots), boil 20 minutes or so, then add peppers, mushrooms and other soft veggies, boil until tender.
·         Taste, and add more salt and pepper if needed
·         Remove stone and serve!

 

2/16 BWL & Preschool Place

 

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